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Congratulations Veterans!

The Toxic Exposure Research Act is Part of a Bill That Just Passed the House and Senate

 

 

On Saturday, the Miller-Blumenthal Veterans Health Care and Benefits Act, H.R. 6416 passed the senate.  The bill passed both the House and the Senate by unanimous approval and is now on the way to the President's Desk for signature into law.

 

Included in the legislation are these provisions of the Toxic Exposure Research Act:

 

Subtitle C---Toxic Exposure:

 

Sec. 631. Definitions.

Sec. 632. National Academy of Medicine assessment on research relating to the descendants of individuals with toxic exposure.

Sec. 633. Advisory board on research relating to health conditions of descendants of veterans with toxic exposure while serving in the Armed Forces.

Sec. 634. Research relating to health conditions of descendants of veterans with toxic exposure while serving in the Armed Forces.


*For complete text go to https://www.govtrack.us/congress/bills/114/hr6416/text

 

4/26/2017

Senator Jerry Moran (KS) introduced S. 609, the Chiropractic Care Available to All Veterans Act of 2017, which would require VA to offer chiropractic care at a minimum of 75 VA medical centers by the end of 2018 and at every VA medical center by the end of 2020. VA currently offers chiropractic services as part of its medical benefits package. However, VA’s website indicates that only about 65 VA medical centers have chiropractors on site who are integrated into primary care, rehabilitation and other specialized care teams. 

 

Good News: VA Lowers Medication Copayments

Woman Helping withInhaler

 

There's good news for many Veterans receiving prescriptions from VA. As of February 27, 2017, the regulations for copayments will change. The cost to most Veterans for medications required on an outpatient basis to treat non-service connected conditions will be less. VA's goal is to reduce out-of-pocket costs and simplify getting prescriptions to Veterans. This will also benefit Veterans in rural communities, where VA medical centers and local pharmacies may not be close to many Veterans homes. Learn more. 

http://www.va.gov/opa/pressrel/pressrelease.cfm?id=2846

VA Study Confirms High Cure Rates With New Hepatitis C Drugs

12/13/2016 01:10 PM EST

 

A Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) database study shows that new drug regimens for hepatitis C have resulted in 'remarkably high' cure rates among patients in VA's national health care system.

VA Partners with Prostate Cancer Foundation to Expand Clinical Research

11/29/2016 02:48 PM EST

 

As a national leader in oncology advancement and as the largest integrated healthcare system in the nation, the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) today announced an important and substantial partnership with the Prostate Cancer Foundation (PCF) to prevent, screen and promote research to speed the development of treatments and cures for prostate cancer among Veterans. Announcement of the partnership was made during Launch Pad: Pathways to Cancer InnoVAtion, a joint VA/PCF summit held today that brings together world-class oncology experts, corporate and nonprofit partners to discuss research, big data, technology and clinical solutions to advance screening, diagnostics and care coordination for cancer and to promote the implementation of best practices across the VA healthcare system.

 

COACHING MATTERS

Coaching Into Care's National Director, Steven Sayers, Ph.D., at the Philadelphia Veterans Affairs Medical Center, was interviewed for this story that appeared in the Burlington County Times on August 7, 2016. 

It chronicles the daily challenges families face when a loved one returns home with Posttraumatic Stress, how it is possible to live with PTSD, and what can be done to help win these battles at home. 

Read the Full Story here>>

PTSD is a battle for veterans' spouses, too | Local News | burlingtoncountytimes.com


 

 

VA call center helps with Choice Program billing

Veterans can now work directly with the VA to resolve debt collection issues resulting from inappropriate or delayed Choice Program billing. 

 

The VA has set up a Community Care Call Center for veterans experiencing adverse credit reporting or debt collection resulting from inappropriately billed Choice Program claims. Veterans experiencing these problems can call 877-881-7618 for assistance.

 

The new call center will work to resolve instances of improper veteran billing and assist community care medical providers with delayed payments. VA staff are also trained and ready to work with medical providers to expunge adverse credit reporting on veterans resulting from delayed payments to providers.

.
Healthcare for Iraq/Afghan Veterans:
Iraq and Afghanistan veterans discharged from active duty
on or after January 28, 2003, may be eligible for five years of medical care.
The Department of Veterans Affairs is trying to reach out to eligible veterans
who served “in a theater of combat operations” to let them know that they may
be eligible for complete health care coverage for five years post service. To
determine eligibility, visit the Veterans Health Administration website at: http://www.va.gov/healthbenefits/resources/eligibility_check.asp.
 call 1-877-222-VETS (8387), 8 a.m.-8 p.m. EST.

"New VA Medical Card (Important)" The new VA Medical Card is ready to be reissued. As a reminder the old card you may have has a security privacy violation, and for some of you who may remain to have to old paper card, you need to get a new one, the security violation if you recall is that the current medical card can be seen by an camera with your social security number on it, which violates privacy and the HIPPA The requirements to have this reissued is: (1) have the old card available (2) two sets of picture ID (1) drivers license (2) government ID (3) CPL/CCW license just too mention a few.

FREE DENTAL CARE FOR CHILDREN

Feature Topic

Anger and Aggression

Couple having a disagreement

Anger is a common response to trauma. It can create major problems in the personal lives of those who have experienced trauma and those who suffer from PTSD.

Anger can be especially common if you have been betrayed by others. This may be most often seen in cases of trauma that involve exploitation or violence.

Anger can be experienced as physical arousal, thoughts and feelings, and aggressive behavior.

Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment of Anger

Cognitive-behavioral treatment (CBT) can help with:

  • The increased physical arousal, tension, and negative emotions that come with anger by teaching you skills like progressive muscle relaxation and deep breathing.
  • Recognizing and challenging the thoughts that make you angry and respond using positive coping rather than aggressive behaviors.

Cognitive-behavioral therapies that work for PTSD, like Cognitive-Processing Therapy and Prolonged Exposure, have also been found to help with anger. Learn more about these and other PTSD treatments.

PTSD Coach Online for Stress and Anger

PTSD Coach Online is a web-based self-help resource offering 17 tools to address stress-related symptoms and enhance problem-solving skills. It includes nine tools to help you manage anger.

back to top

"New VA Medical Card (Important)" The new VA Medical Card is ready to be reissued. Click here for details

VA’s Caregiver Support Line facilitates monthly telephone education groups for family Caregivers of Veterans with a theme of “Care for the Caregiver.”  A different topic is presented every month with the goal of helping Caregivers develop tools and strategies to help balance the demands of caregiving, while also focusing on the importance of self-care.   Topics include Focusing on the Forgotten…ME!, Goodbye to Going It Alone: Learning to Ask for  Help, and Safe Haven: Building on Family Strength.  These groups are available to any family Caregiver currently caring for a Veteran enrolled in VA healthcare.  Veterans enrolled in VA healthcare who are caring for a loved one at home are also eligible to participate.  For more information or to register for a group, please contact your local Caregiver Support Coordinator. To find your local Caregiver Support Coordinator or for more information, tips, and tools to support you in your role as the family Caregiver of a Veteran, please visit VA’s website dedicated to Caregivers, www.caregiver.va.gov.

 

Family Caregiver’s Guide to Traumatic Brain Injury, the Family Caregiver’s Guide to PTSD, and the Family Caregiver’s Guide to Multiple Sclerosis, can be found here http://www.caregiver.va.gov/toolbox/toolbox_sheets.asp. Please visit VA’s website dedicated to Caregivers, www.caregiver.va.gov, for more information, tips, and tools to support you in your role as the family Caregiver of a Veteran

3/1/14

INFORMATION ON MESOTHELIOMA

We are a charitable organization supporting the VFW and American Legion. Symptoms of mesothelioma cancer are easily mistaken for less serious illnesses,  so early detection and awareness is crucial in improving survival rates. The reason this cancer targets so many veterans is because of the extensive amount of asbestos used in past military equipment. Our organization provides free veteran-specific resources and support for patients and their loved ones. Our goal at the Mesothelioma Group is to increase recognition, improving survival rates and life expectancy.

Click here for our veteran specific page www.mesotheliomagroup.com/veterans/

Mesothelioma is a deadly cancer that is caused by asbestos particle exposure. A third of all mesothelioma patients are veterans due to the prevalence of asbestos use in the military in the past. Our goal at Mesothelioma Guide is to increase awareness and provide support to veterans with mesothelioma. You can find more information about mesothelioma veteran benefits here: http://www.mesotheliomaguide.com/veterans/ 

Learn About the Leading Mesothelioma Lawyers in Your Area

Free Brochures and Information

 http://www.mesotheliomalawyercenter.org/

 

. Update on Affordable Care Act and VA /Tricare: With coverage standards under the Affordable Care Act or ACA going into effect January 2014, (IRS penalties have been delayed until 2015), VA wants veterans to know the facts. If you are enrolled in VA you will receive a letter through the mail informing you of your coverage and that you meet the "minimum essential coverage" required under the law. The health care law does not change VA health benefits or veterans' out-of-pocket costs. Letters are being mailed in priority group order beginning with priority group 1 through 8. The mailing should be completed by the end of October. Veterans covered by VA with family members who are not enrolled in CHAMPVA should use other private insurance (via an employer) or choose coverage within the Marketplace/State Exchanges which will be open for enrollment October 2013. TRICARE beneficiaries will also be seen as having minimum essential coverage and DOD will inform the IRS of all individual beneficiaries who have TRICARE based on the information listed in the Defense Enrollment Eligibility Reporting System or DEERS. It's important that social security numbers for all family members are accurate in DEERS including any children using TRICARE programs. There are some exemptions within the law. For more information about VA and the ACA click here: http://www.va.gov/health/aca/
For TRICARE coverage and ACA, go here:
http://www.tricare.mil/tma/hipaa/ppaca.aspx

TRICARE, also known as
  the Civilian Health and Medical Program of the Uniformed
  Services (CHAMPUS), provides civilian health
  benefits for military personnel, vets and their dependents. As
  the defense budget continues to be slashed, many vet advocates have expressed
  concern that TRICARE would be affected. But the House armed services
  subcommittee on military personnel rejected the White House’s plan to
  substantially increase TRICARE fees over the next five years for military
  retirees and their families. It also rejected a proposal to vary the fees
  based on individual retiree’s pay levels.

The House panel did agree
  to allow a $4 co-pay increase for retirees and their family members below the
  age of 65 for outpatient care. Doctor visit co-pays are slated to increase to
  $16, while the co-pay for mental health care visits will stay at $12. The $4
  increase is expected to save funds for health programs and medical research.
  The Department of Defense has not been authorized to increase any additional
  TRICARE fees.

The Secretary of Defense
  along with the Joint Chiefs of Staff had pushed for higher TRICARE fees to
  save fund for supplies, training, maintenance, and weapons procurement from
  being slashed. But resistance to boosting fees or capping pay from bipartisan
  members of the House Armed Services Committee has so far kept fees low.
  Additionally, Defense officials have reportedly overstated health care costs
  to the tune of $400 million a year, on average, to fund other defense
  accounts.

President Obama may
  decide to cap the military pay raise regardless of congressional approval by
  declaring a national emergency or claiming that “serious economic conditions”
  make it necessary, and presenting “alternative pay adjustment” plans to
  Congress by the first of September. It is hoped that the White House will not
  decide to do so, as there is currently in place a proposed 1.8 percent raise
  for military pay as of January 2013.

The Department of Defense
  currently plans to roll out a plan to stop TRICARE Prime coverage for the
  more than 170,000 current TRICARE enrollees who live more than 40 miles from
  a military treatment facility. Retirees below the age of 65 and their
  families will be forced to use TRICARE Standard, a more economic version of
  the fee-for-service program. As of October 1, TRICARE beneficiaries age 65
  and up will be required to have their long-term medications filled via mail
  order or on base, in order to save millions of dollars a year for TRICARE
  that would otherwise go to local pharmacies.

Legal Help for Veterans, PLLC
  fights for veterans rights. We fight to make sure you get the benefits you
  deserve from the Department of Veterans Affairs. To learn more or contact a veterans attorney, visit http://www.legalhelpforveterans.com/
  or call 800.693.4800

TRICARE, also known as
  the Civilian Health and Medical Program of the Uniformed
  Services (CHAMPUS), provides civilian health
  benefits for military personnel, vets and their dependents. As
  the defense budget continues to be slashed, many vet advocates have expressed
  concern that TRICARE would be affected. But the House armed services
  subcommittee on military personnel rejected the White House’s plan to
  substantially increase TRICARE fees over the next five years for military
  retirees and their families. It also rejected a proposal to vary the fees
  based on individual retiree’s pay levels.

The House panel did agree
  to allow a $4 co-pay increase for retirees and their family members below the
  age of 65 for outpatient care. Doctor visit co-pays are slated to increase to
  $16, while the co-pay for mental health care visits will stay at $12. The $4
  increase is expected to save funds for health programs and medical research.
  The Department of Defense has not been authorized to increase any additional
  TRICARE fees.

The Secretary of Defense
  along with the Joint Chiefs of Staff had pushed for higher TRICARE fees to
  save fund for supplies, training, maintenance, and weapons procurement from
  being slashed. But resistance to boosting fees or capping pay from bipartisan
  members of the House Armed Services Committee has so far kept fees low.
  Additionally, Defense officials have reportedly overstated health care costs
  to the tune of $400 million a year, on average, to fund other defense
  accounts.

President Obama may
  decide to cap the military pay raise regardless of congressional approval by
  declaring a national emergency or claiming that “serious economic conditions”
  make it necessary, and presenting “alternative pay adjustment” plans to
  Congress by the first of September. It is hoped that the White House will not
  decide to do so, as there is currently in place a proposed 1.8 percent raise
  for military pay as of January 2013.

The Department of Defense
  currently plans to roll out a plan to stop TRICARE Prime coverage for the
  more than 170,000 current TRICARE enrollees who live more than 40 miles from
  a military treatment facility. Retirees below the age of 65 and their
  families will be forced to use TRICARE Standard, a more economic version of
  the fee-for-service program. As of October 1, TRICARE beneficiaries age 65
  and up will be required to have their long-term medications filled via mail
  order or on base, in order to save millions of dollars a year for TRICARE
  that would otherwise go to local pharmacies.

Legal Help for Veterans, PLLC
  fights for veterans rights. We fight to make sure you get the benefits you
  deserve from the Department of Veterans Affairs. To learn more or contact a veterans attorney, visit http://www.legalhelpforveterans.com/
  or call 800.693.4800
TRICARE, also known as

  the Civilian Health and Medical Program of the Uniformed
  Services (CHAMPUS), provides civilian health
  benefits for military personnel, vets and their dependents. As
  the defense budget continues to be slashed, many vet advocates have expressed
  concern that TRICARE would be affected. But the House armed services
  subcommittee on military personnel rejected the White House’s plan to
  substantially increase TRICARE fees over the next five years for military
  retirees and their families. It also rejected a proposal to vary the fees
  based on individual retiree’s pay levels.

The House panel did agree
  to allow a $4 co-pay increase for retirees and their family members below the
  age of 65 for outpatient care. Doctor visit co-pays are slated to increase to
  $16, while the co-pay for mental health care visits will stay at $12. The $4
  increase is expected to save funds for health programs and medical research.
  The Department of Defense has not been authorized to increase any additional
  TRICARE fees.

The Secretary of Defense
  along with the Joint Chiefs of Staff had pushed for higher TRICARE fees to
  save fund for supplies, training, maintenance, and weapons procurement from
  being slashed. But resistance to boosting fees or capping pay from bipartisan
  members of the House Armed Services Committee has so far kept fees low.
  Additionally, Defense officials have reportedly overstated health care costs
  to the tune of $400 million a year, on average, to fund other defense
  accounts.

President Obama may
  decide to cap the military pay raise regardless of congressional approval by
  declaring a national emergency or claiming that “serious economic conditions”
  make it necessary, and presenting “alternative pay adjustment” plans to
  Congress by the first of September. It is hoped that the White House will not
  decide to do so, as there is currently in place a proposed 1.8 percent raise
  for military pay as of January 2013.

The Department of Defense
  currently plans to roll out a plan to stop TRICARE Prime coverage for the
  more than 170,000 current TRICARE enrollees who live more than 40 miles from
  a military treatment facility. Retirees below the age of 65 and their
  families will be forced to use TRICARE Standard, a more economic version of
  the fee-for-service program. As of October 1, TRICARE beneficiaries age 65
  and up will be required to have their long-term medications filled via mail
  order or on base, in order to save millions of dollars a year for TRICARE
  that would otherwise go to local pharmacies.

Legal Help for Veterans, PLLC
  fights for veterans rights. We fight to make sure you get the benefits you
  deserve from the Department of Veterans Affairs. To learn more or contact a veterans attorney, visit http://www.legalhelpforveterans.com/
  or call 800.693.4800
TRICARE, also known as

  the Civilian Health and Medical Program of the Uniformed
  Services (CHAMPUS), provides civilian health
  benefits for military personnel, vets and their dependents. As
  the defense budget continues to be slashed, many vet advocates have expressed
  concern that TRICARE would be affected. But the House armed services
  subcommittee on military personnel rejected the White House’s plan to
  substantially increase TRICARE fees over the next five years for military
  retirees and their families. It also rejected a proposal to vary the fees
  based on individual retiree’s pay levels.

The House panel did agree
  to allow a $4 co-pay increase for retirees and their family members below the
  age of 65 for outpatient care. Doctor visit co-pays are slated to increase to
  $16, while the co-pay for mental health care visits will stay at $12. The $4
  increase is expected to save funds for health programs and medical research.
  The Department of Defense has not been authorized to increase any additional
  TRICARE fees.

The Secretary of Defense
  along with the Joint Chiefs of Staff had pushed for higher TRICARE fees to
  save fund for supplies, training, maintenance, and weapons procurement from
  being slashed. But resistance to boosting fees or capping pay from bipartisan
  members of the House Armed Services Committee has so far kept fees low.
  Additionally, Defense officials have reportedly overstated health care costs
  to the tune of $400 million a year, on average, to fund other defense
  accounts.

President Obama may
  decide to cap the military pay raise regardless of congressional approval by
  declaring a national emergency or claiming that “serious economic conditions”
  make it necessary, and presenting “alternative pay adjustment” plans to
  Congress by the first of September. It is hoped that the White House will not
  decide to do so, as there is currently in place a proposed 1.8 percent raise
  for military pay as of January 2013.

The Department of Defense
  currently plans to roll out a plan to stop TRICARE Prime coverage for the
  more than 170,000 current TRICARE enrollees who live more than 40 miles from
  a military treatment facility. Retirees below the age of 65 and their
  families will be forced to use TRICARE Standard, a more economic version of
  the fee-for-service program. As of October 1, TRICARE beneficiaries age 65
  and up will be required to have their long-term medications filled via mail
  order or on base, in order to save millions of dollars a year for TRICARE
  that would otherwise go to local pharmacies.

Legal Help for Veterans, PLLC
  fights for veterans rights. We fight to make sure you get the benefits you
  deserve from the Department of Veterans Affairs. To learn more or contact a veterans attorney, visit http://www.legalhelpforveterans.com/
  or call 800.693.4800

TRICARE, also known as
  the Civilian Health and Medical Program of the Uniformed
  Services (CHAMPUS), provides civilian health
  benefits for military personnel, vets and their dependents. As
  the defense budget continues to be slashed, many vet advocates have expressed
  concern that TRICARE would be affected. But the House armed services
  subcommittee on military personnel rejected the White House’s plan to
  substantially increase TRICARE fees over the next five years for military
  retirees and their families. It also rejected a proposal to vary the fees
  based on individual retiree’s pay levels.

The House panel did agree
  to allow a $4 co-pay increase for retirees and their family members below the
  age of 65 for outpatient care. Doctor visit co-pays are slated to increase to
  $16, while the co-pay for mental health care visits will stay at $12. The $4
  increase is expected to save funds for health programs and medical research.
  The Department of Defense has not been authorized to increase any additional
  TRICARE fees.

The Secretary of Defense
  along with the Joint Chiefs of Staff had pushed for higher TRICARE fees to
  save fund for supplies, training, maintenance, and weapons procurement from
  being slashed. But resistance to boosting fees or capping pay from bipartisan
  members of the House Armed Services Committee has so far kept fees low.
  Additionally, Defense officials have reportedly overstated health care costs
  to the tune of $400 million a year, on average, to fund other defense
  accounts.

President Obama may
  decide to cap the military pay raise regardless of congressional approval by
  declaring a national emergency or claiming that “serious economic conditions”
  make it necessary, and presenting “alternative pay adjustment” plans to
  Congress by the first of September. It is hoped that the White House will not
  decide to do so, as there is currently in place a proposed 1.8 percent raise
  for military pay as of January 2013.

The Department of Defense
  currently plans to roll out a plan to stop TRICARE Prime coverage for the
  more than 170,000 current TRICARE enrollees who live more than 40 miles from
  a military treatment facility. Retirees below the age of 65 and their
  families will be forced to use TRICARE Standard, a more economic version of
  the fee-for-service program. As of October 1, TRICARE beneficiaries age 65
  and up will be required to have their long-term medications filled via mail
  order or on base, in order to save millions of dollars a year for TRICARE
  that would otherwise go to local pharmacies.

Legal Help for Veterans, PLLC
  fights for veterans rights. We fight to make sure you get the benefits you
  deserve from the Department of Veterans Affairs. To learn more or contact a veterans attorney, visit http://www.legalhelpforveterans.com/
  or call 800.693.4800

 
 
 
 

TRICARE, also known as
  the Civilian Health and Medical Program of the Uniformed
  Services (CHAMPUS), provides civilian health
  benefits for military personnel, vets and their dependents. As
  the defense budget continues to be slashed, many vet advocates have expressed
  concern that TRICARE would be affected. But the House armed services
  subcommittee on military personnel rejected the White House’s plan to
  substantially increase TRICARE fees over the next five years for military
  retirees and their families. It also rejected a proposal to vary the fees
  based on individual retiree’s pay levels.

The House panel did agree
  to allow a $4 co-pay increase for retirees and their family members below the
  age of 65 for outpatient care. Doctor visit co-pays are slated to increase to
  $16, while the co-pay for mental health care visits will stay at $12. The $4
  increase is expected to save funds for health programs and medical research.
  The Department of Defense has not been authorized to increase any additional
  TRICARE fees.

The Secretary of Defense
  along with the Joint Chiefs of Staff had pushed for higher TRICARE fees to
  save fund for supplies, training, maintenance, and weapons procurement from
  being slashed. But resistance to boosting fees or capping pay from bipartisan
  members of the House Armed Services Committee has so far kept fees low.
  Additionally, Defense officials have reportedly overstated health care costs
  to the tune of $400 million a year, on average, to fund other defense
  accounts.

President Obama may
  decide to cap the military pay raise regardless of congressional approval by
  declaring a national emergency or claiming that “serious economic conditions”
  make it necessary, and presenting “alternative pay adjustment” plans to
  Congress by the first of September. It is hoped that the White House will not
  decide to do so, as there is currently in place a proposed 1.8 percent raise
  for military pay as of January 2013.

The Department of Defense
  currently plans to roll out a plan to stop TRICARE Prime coverage for the
  more than 170,000 current TRICARE enrollees who live more than 40 miles from
  a military treatment facility. Retirees below the age of 65 and their
  families will be forced to use TRICARE Standard, a more economic version of
  the fee-for-service program. As of October 1, TRICARE beneficiaries age 65
  and up will be required to have their long-term medications filled via mail
  order or on base, in order to save millions of dollars a year for TRICARE
  that would otherwise go to local pharmacies.

Legal Help for Veterans, PLLC
  fights for veterans rights. We fight to make sure you get the benefits you
  deserve from the Department of Veterans Affairs. To learn more or contact a veterans attorney, visit http://www.legalhelpforveterans.com/
  or call 800.693.4800




 

September  Birthdays:

Happy Birthday to: 

Tina, Reaha, Linda, Michelle, Wendy and Vera 

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